LinkedIn R Programming Assessment Answers

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LinkedIn R Programming Assessment Answers
LinkedIn R Programming Assessment

100% Free Updated LinkedIn R Programming Assessment Certification Exam Questions & Answers.

LinkedIn R Programming Assessment Details:

  • 15 – 20 multiple-choice questions
  • 1.5 minutes per question
  • Score in the top 30% to earn a badge

Before you start:

You must complete this assessment in one session — make sure your internet is reliable.
You can retake this assessment once if you don’t earn a badge.
LinkedIn won’t show your results to anyone without your permission.
After completing the exam, you will get the verified LinkedIn R Programming Assessment  Badge.

LinkedIn R Programming Assessment Answers:

Q1. How does a matrix differ from a data frame?

  • [ ] A matrix may contain numeric values only.
  • [ ] A matrix must not be singular.
  • [x] A data frame may contain variables that have different modes.
  • [ ] A data frame may contain variables of different lengths.

Q2. What value does this statement return?

unclass(as.Date("1971-01-01"))

  • [ ] 1
  • [x] 365
  • [ ] 4
  • [ ] 12

Q3. What do you use to take an object such as a data frame out of the workspace?

  • [x] remove()
  • [ ] erase()
  • [ ] detach()
  • [ ] delete()

Q4. Review the following code. What is the result of line 3?

xvect<-c(1,2,3)
xvect[2] <- "2"
xvect
  • [ ] [1] 1 2 3
  • [ ] [1] “1” 2 “3”
  • [x] [1] “1” “2” “3”
  • [ ] [1] 7 9

Q5. The variable height is a numeric vector in the code below. Which statement returns the value 35?

  • [ ] height(length(height))
  • [x] height[length(height)]
  • [ ] height[length[height]]
  • [ ] height(5)

Q6. In the image below, the data frame is named rates. The statement sd(rates[, 2]) returns 39. As what does R regard Ellen’s product ratings?

Image
  • [ ] sample with replacement
  • [ ] population
  • [ ] trimmed sample
  • [x] sample <– not sure

Q7. Which choice does R regard as an acceptable name for a variable?

  • [ ] Var_A!
  • [ ] \_VarA
  • [ ] .2Var_A
  • [x] Var2_A

Q8. What is the principal difference between an array and a matrix?

  • [x] A matrix has two dimensions, while an array can have three or more dimensions.
  • [ ] An array is a subtype of the data frame, while a matrix is a separate type entirely.
  • [ ] A matrix can have columns of different lengths, but an array’s columns must all be the same length.
  • [ ] A matrix may contain numeric values only, while an array can mix different types of values.

Q9. Which is not a property of lists and vectors?

  • [ ] type
  • [ ] length
  • [ ] attributes
  • [x] scalar

Q10. In the image below, the data frame on lines 1 through 4 is named StDf. State and Capital are both factors. Which statement returns the results shown on lines 6 and 7?

Image
  • [ ] StDf[1:2,-3]
  • [x] StDf[1:2,1]
  • [ ] StDf[1:2,]
  • [ ] StDf[1,2,]

Q11. Which function displays the first five rows of the data frame named pizza?

  • [ ] BOF(pizza, 5)
  • [ ] first(pizza, 5)
  • [ ] top(pizza, 5)
  • [x] head(pizza, 5)

Q12. You accidentally display a large data frame on the R console, losing all the statements you entered during the current session. What is the best way to get the prior 25 statements back?

  • [ ] console(-25)
  • [ ] console(reverse=TRUE)
  • [ ] history()
  • [x] history(max.show = 25)

Q13. d.pizza is a data frame. It’s a column named temperature contains only numbers. If you extract temperature using the [] accessors, its class defaults to numeric. How can you access temperature so that it retains the class of data.frame?

> class( d.pizza[ , "temperature" ] )
> "numeric"
  • [ ] class( d.pizza( , "temperature" ) )
  • [ ] class( d.pizza[ , "temperature" ] )
  • [ ] class( d.pizza$temperature )
  • [x] class( d.pizza[ , "temperature", drop=F ] )

Q14. What does c contain?

a <- c(3,3,6.5,8)
b <- c(7,2,5.5,10)
c <- a < b
  • [ ] [1] NaN
  • [ ] [1] -4
  • [ ] [1] 4 -1 -1 2
  • [x] [1] TRUE FALSE FALSE TRUE

Q15. Review the statements below. Does the use of the dim function change the class of y, and if so what is y’s new class?

> y <- 1:9
> dim(y) <- c(3,3)
  • [ ] No, y’s new class is “array”.
  • [x] Yes, y’s new class is “matrix”.
  • [ ] No, y’s new class is “vector”.
  • [ ] Yes, y’s new class is “integer”.

Q16. What is mydf$y in this code?

mydf <- data.frame(x=1:3, y=c("a","b","c"), stringAsFactors=FALSE)

  • [ ] list
  • [ ] string
  • [ ] factor
  • [x] character vector

Q17. How does a vector differ from a list?

  • [ ] Vectors are used only for numeric data, while lists are useful for both numeric and string data.
  • [ ] Vectors and lists are the same thing and can be used interchangeably.
  • [x] A vector contains items of a single data type, while a list can contain items of different data types.
  • [ ] Vectors are like arrays, while lists are like data frames.

Q18. What statement shows the objects on your workspace?

  • [ ] list.objects()
  • [ ] print.objects()
  • [ ] getws()
  • [x] ls()

Q19. What function joins two or more column vectors to form a data frame?

  • [ ] rbind()
  • [x] cbind()
  • [ ] bind()
  • [ ] coerce()

Q20. Review line 1 below. What does the statement in line 2 return?

1 mylist <- list(1,2,"C",4,5)
2 unlist(mylist)
  • [ ] [1] 1 2 4 5
  • [ ] “C”
  • [x] [1] “1” “2” “C” “4” “5”
  • [ ] [1] 1 2 C 4 5

Q21. What is the value of y in this code?

x <- NA
y <- x/1
  • [ ] Inf
  • [ ] Null
  • [ ] NaN
  • [x] NA

Q22. Two variable in the mydata data frame are named Var1 and Var2. How do you tell a bivariate function, such as cor.test, which two variables you want to analyze?

  • [ ] cor.test(Var1 ~ Var2)
  • [ ] cor.test(mydata$(Var1,Var2))
  • [x] cor.test(mydata$Var1,mydata$Var2)
  • [ ] cor.test(Var1,Var2, mydata)

Q23. A data frame named d.pizza is part of the DescTools package. A statement is missing from the following R code and an error is therefore likely to occur. Which statement is missing?

library(DescTools)
deliver <- aggregate(count,by=list(area,driver), FUN=mean)
print(deliver)
  • [x] attach(d.pizza)
  • [ ] summarize(deliver)
  • [ ] mean <- rbind(d.pizza,count)
  • [ ] deliver[!complete.cases(deliver),]

Q24. How to name rows and columns in DataFrames and Matrices F in R?

  • [ ] data frame: names() and rownames() matrix: colnames() and row.names()
  • [x] data frame: names() and row.names() matrix: dimnames() (not sure)
  • [ ] data frame: colnames() and row.names() matrix: names() and rownames()
  • [ ] data frame: colnames() and rownames() matrix: names() and row.names()

Q25. Which set of two statements-followed by the cbind() function-results in a data frame named vbound?

  • [ ]
v1<-list(1,2,3)
v2<-list(c(4,5,6))
vbound<-cbind(v1,v2)
  • [ ]
v1<-c(1,2,3)
v2<-list(4,5,6))
vbound<-cbind(v1,v2)
  • [ ]
v1<-c(1,2,3)
v2<-c(4,5,6))
vbound<-cbind(v1,v2)

Q26. ournames is a character vector. What values does the statement below return to Cpeople?

Cpeople <- ournames %in% grep("^C", ournames, value=TRUE)

  • [ ] records where the first character is a C
  • [ ] any record with a value containing a C
  • [ ] TRUE or FALSE, depending on whether any character in ournames is C
  • [x] TRUE and FALSE values, depending on whether the first character in an ournames record is C

Q27. What is the value of names(v[4])?

v <- 1:3
names(v) <- c("a", "b", "c")
v[4] <- 4
  • [x] “”
  • [ ] d
  • [ ] NULL
  • [ ] NA

Q28. Which of the following statements doesn’t yield the code output below. Review the following code. What is the result of line 3?

x <- c(1, 2, 3, 4)
Output: [1] 2 3 4
  • [ ] x[c(2, 3, 4)]
  • [ ] x[-1]
  • [ ] x[c(-1, 0, 0, 0)]
  • [x] x[c(-1, 2, 3, 4)]

Q29. Given DFMerged <- merge(DF1, DF2) and the image below, how manu rows are in DFMerged?

image
  • [ ] 6
  • [ ] 9
  • [ ] 3
  • [x] 0

Q30. What does R return in response to the final statement?

x<-5:8
names(x)<-letters[5:8]
x
  • [ ] e f g h
    “5” “6” “7” “8”
  • [ ] 5 6 7 8
  • [ ] e f g h
  • [x] e f g h
    5 6 7 8

Q31. How do you return “October” from x in this code?

x<-as.Date("2018-10-01")
  • [ ] attr()
  • [x] months(x)
  • [ ] as.month(x)
  • [ ] month(x)

Q32. How will R respond to the last line of this code?

fact<-factor(c("Rep","Dem","Dem","Rep"))
fact
[1] Rep Dem Dem Rep
Levels: Rep Dem
fact[2]<-"Ind"
  • [ ] >
  • [ ] [,2]Ind
  • [x] invalid factor level, NA generated
  • [ ] Ind

Q33. What does R return?

StartDate<- as.Date("2020/2/28")
StopDate<- as.Date("2020/3/1")
StopDate-StartDate
  • [ ] “1970-01-02”
  • [ ] time difference of one day
  • [x] time difference of two days
  • [ ] error in x-y: nonnumeric argument to binary operator

Q34. What does the expression mtrx * mtrx do ?

> mtrx <- matrix( c(3,5,8,4), nrow= 2,ncol=2,byrow=TRUE)
> newmat <- mtrx * mtrx
  • [ ] it transpose mtrx
  • [ ] it premultiplies the current netwmat row by the newmat column.
  • [ ] it returns the results of a matrix multiplication
  • [x] It squares each cell in mtrx
> newmat
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    9   25
[2,]   64   16
# The `%*%` operator gives matrix multiplication
> mtrx %*% mtrx
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]   49   35
[2,]   56   56

Q35. Which function in R combines different values into a single object?

  • [ ] connect()
  • [ ] concat()
  • [ ] contact()
  • [x] c()

Q36. Which file contains settings that R uses for all users of a given installation of R?

  • [ ] Rdefaults.site
  • [ ] Renviron.site
  • [x] Rprofile.site
  • [ ] Rstatus.site

Q37. If mdf is a data frame, which statement is true ?

  • [x] ncol(mdf) equals length(mdf).
  • [ ] The number of rows must equals the number of columns.
  • [ ] The legnth of any column in mdf may differ from any other column in mdf
  • [ ] All columns must have the same data type.

Q38. A list can contain a list as an element. MyList has five columns, and the third column’s item is a list of three items. How do you put all seven values in MyList into a single vector?

  • [ ] vector(MyList, length = 7)
  • [ ] coerce(MyList, nrows = 1)
  • [x] unlist(MyList)
  • [ ] coerce(MyList, nrows = 7)

Q39. Which strings could be returned by the function ls(path = “^V”)?

  • [ ] ANOVAData, anovadata
  • [x] VisitPCA, VarX
  • [ ] VisitPCA, varx
  • [ ] Xvar, Yvar

Q40. StDf is a data frame. Based on this knowledge, what does this statement return?

StDf[, -1]
  • [ ] all but the first row and first column of StDf
  • [ ] all but the final column of StDf
  • [x] all but the first column of StDf
  • [ ] only the first column of StDf

Q41. Which statement enables you to interactively open a single file?

  • [ ] file.list()
  • [ ] file.select()
  • [x] file.choose()
  • [ ] file.open()

Q42. How are these data types alike: logical, integer, numeric, and character?

  • [ ] Each is a type of data frame.
  • [x] Each is a type of atomic vector.
  • [ ] Each is a type of complex vector.
  • [ ] Each is a type of raw vector.

Q43. What does the MyMat[ ,3] subsetting operation return for this code?

MyMat = matrix(c(7, 9, 8, 6, 10, 12),nrow=2,ncol=3, byrow = TRUE)
  • [ ]
[ ,3]
[1, ] 8
[2, ] 12
  • [x]
[1] 8 12
  • [ ]
[1] 10 12
  • [ ]
[ ,3]
[1, ] 10
[2, ] 12

Q44. What does the function power.anova.test return?

  • [ ] the probability of making a Type I error
  • [x] the probability of not making a Type II error
  • [ ] the probability of making a Type II error
  • [ ] the probability of not making a Type I error

Q45. Review the statement below. What is the effect of covariate:factor on the analysis?

result <- lm(outcome ~ covariate + factor + covariate:factor, data = testcoef)
  • [ ] It forces the intercepts of the individual regressions to zero.
  • [x] It calls for the effect of the covariate within each level of the factor.
  • [ ] It calls for the effect of each variable from covariate to factor in testcoef.
  • [ ] It forces the covariate to enter the equation before the factor levels.
# Example call to demonstrate.  `Species` is a Factor.  Petal.Length, Petal.Width are numeric.
# see `help(formula)` for more details on the formula specification.  `:` is "effect modification" or "interaction"
> summary(lm(Petal.Length ~ Petal.Width + Species + Petal.Width:Species, data = iris))
...
Petal.Width:Speciesversicolor   1.3228     0.5552   2.382   0.0185 *
Petal.Width:Speciesvirginica    0.1008     0.5248   0.192   0.8480
...

Q46. A variable whose type is numeric can contain which items?

  • [ ] integers and real values
  • [ ] integers, real, and raw values
  • [x] real values only
  • [ ] integers, real, and logical values

Q47. What is the legitimate name of a data class in R?

  • [ ] property
  • [x] integer
  • [ ] number
  • [ ] variant

Q48. How do you extract the values above the main diagonal from a square matrix named Rmat?

  • [x] Rmat[upper.tri(Rmat)]
  • [ ] upper.triangular(Rmat)
  • [ ] upper.tri(Rmat)
  • [ ] upper.diag(Rmat)

Q49. x is a vector of type integer, as shown on line 1 below. What is the type of the result returned by the statement > median(x)?

x <- c(12L, 6L, 10L, 8L, 15L, 14L, 19L, 18L, 23L, 59L)

  • [ ] numeric
  • [ ] integer
  • [ ] single
  • [x] double

Q50. A list named a is created using the statement below. Which choice returns TRUE?

a <- list("10", TRUE, 5.6)

  • [x] is.list(a[1])
  • [ ] is.numeric(a[1])
  • [ ] is.logical(a[1])
  • [ ] is.character(a[1])

Q51. How do you obtain the row numbers in a data frame named pizza for which the value of pizza$delivery_min is greater than or equal to 30?

  • [ ]
late_delivery <- pizza$delivery_min >= 30
index_late <- index(late_delivery)
index_late
  • [ ]
late_delivery <- pizza$delivery_min >= 30
rownum_late <- rownum(late_delivery)
rownum_late
  • [x]
late_delivery <- pizza$delivery_min >= 30
which_late <- which(late_delivery)
which_late
  • [x]
late_delivery <- pizza$delivery_min >= 30
late <- pizaa$late_delivery
pizza$late

Q52. Which function returns [1] TRUE FALSE TRUE?

indat <- c("Ash Rd","Ash Cir","Ash St")

  • [ ] grepl(“[Rd|Ave|Dr|St]”, indat)
  • [x] grepl(“Rd|Ave|Dr|St”, indat)
  • [ ] grepl(“Rd,Ave,Dr,St”, indat)
  • [ ] grepl(“[Rd],[Ave],[Dr],[St]”, indat)

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FAQs

What is Linkedin Assessment?

The LinkedIn Skill Assessments feature allows you to demonstrate your knowledge of the skills you’ve added to your profile by completing assessments specific to those skills. LinkedIn skills evaluations are a means to demonstrate the skills of job hunters. This is how LinkedIn Skill Assessments can be used.

Is this Skill Assessment Test is free?

Yes, LinkedIn R Programming Assessment Answers is totally free on LinkedIn for you. The only thing is needed i.e. your dedication toward learning.

When I will get Skill Badge?

Yes, if will Pass the Skill Assessment Test, then you will earn a skill badge that will reflect in your LinkedIn profile. For passing in LinkedIn Skill Assessment, you must score 70% or higher, then only you will get your to skill badge.

How to participate in skill quiz assessment?

It’s good practice to update and tweak your LinkedIn profile every few months. After all, life is dynamic and (I hope) you’re always learning new skills. You will notice a button under the Skills & Endorsements tab within your LinkedIn Profile: ‘Take skill quiz.‘ Upon clicking, you will choose your desired skill test quiz and complete your assessment.

LinkedIn Skill Assessments are a series of multiple-choice exams that allow you to prove the skills that are stated in your profile.

How to get Linkedin Skill Badge?

For getting Linkedin Badge in your profile, you need to score at least 70% and above for getting recognition of skill badges.

If you “grade in the 70th percentile or above”—according to LinkedIn—you officially pass and get a LinkedIn skill badge. The social media site will display your badge on your profile.

How long is Skill Assessment valid for?

Skills assessments that do not specify an expiry date are valid for 3 years from the date of the assessment. If more than 3 years have passed by the time the visa application is made, the skills assessment will no longer be valid.

What is the Benefit of Linkedin Skill Assessment?

  • Chances of getting hired will be increased.
  • You will earn Linkedin Skill Badge.
  • Your Linkedin Profile will rank on top.
  • You have a chance to get jobs earlier.
  • This Skill Assessment will enhance your technical skills, helps you to get recognized by top recruiters, and advanced your knowledge by testing your mind.

Who can give this Linkedin Skill Assessment Test?

Any Linkedin User, Any engineer, developer, or programmer, who wants to improve their Programming Skills
Anyone interested in improving their whiteboard coding skills
Anyone who wants to become a Software Engineer, SDE, Data Scientist, Machine Learning Engineer, etc.
Any students in college who want to start a career in Data Science
Students who have at least high school knowledge in math and who want to start learning data structures
Any self-taught programmer who missed out on a computer science degree.

How to do LinkedIn skill assessment

The LinkedIn Skill Assessments feature allows you to demonstrate your knowledge of the skills you’ve added on your profile by completing assessments specific to those skills.

A typical assessment consists of 15 multiple choice questions and each question tests at least one concept or subskill. The questions are timed and must be completed in one session. You can view the full list of available Skill Assessments and sample questions for each.

Available Skill Assessments on LinkedIn

.NET FrameworkAgile Methodologies, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Android, AngularJS, Angular, AutoCAD, AWS, Bash, C, C#, C++, CSS, GIT, Hadoop, HTML, Java, JavaScript, jQuery, JSON, Maven, and MS Vision, QuickBooks, Revit, etc.

What You Need to Know About LinkedIn Skill Assessments

During a job search, wouldn’t it be great to have a way to prove your proficiency in a specific skill to hiring managers?

Well, now there is. On September 17, LinkedIn launched its new Skill Assessments feature. These are online assessments you can take to demonstrate your proficiency in an area such as MS Excel or jQuery. All assessments have been designed by subject matter and LinkedIn Learning experts, and they’re based on an in-depth content creation and review process. Moreover, these assessments seem to be well received: Research shows that job seekers who’ve completed LinkedIn Skill Assessments are approximately 30 percent more likely to get hired than those who haven’t.

How LinkedIn Skill Assessments work
To take an assessment, all you have to do is navigate to the skills section of your profile and select the relevant Skill Assessment. Note that the test is timed. If you have a disability, you can activate the accessibility for the Skill Assessment feature. This will allow you additional time to complete each question.

Your score is private by default, meaning that you can control the visibility of the results. If you score in the 70th percentile or higher, you’ll pass the assessment and have the option of displaying a “verified skill” badge on your profile. If you don’t pass, you can take the assessment again once you’ve brushed up your skills. However, keep in mind that you can only take each assessment once per three months

When you’ve completed an assessment, LinkedIn provides you with an outline of your results. In addition, for a limited time, it offers relevant LinkedIn Learning courses for free so you can improve further. You’ll also receive relevant job recommendations.

According to Andrew Martins in his Business News Daily article “LinkedIn Users Can Now Showcase Skill Assessments,” the following assessments are currently available:

Adobe Acrobat, Angular, AWS, Bash, C, C#, C++, CSS, GIT, Hadoop, HTML, Java, Javascript, jQuery, JSON, Maven, MongoDB, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint, MS Project, MS SharePoint, MS Visio, Node.js, Objective-C, PHP, Python, QuickBooks, Ruby, Ruby on Rails, Scala, Swift, WordPress, and XML. Experts believe that there are also more, non-technical assessments in the making.

A good way to showcase your skills
LinkedIn Skill Assessments offer a brilliant way for you to showcase your abilities to potential employers while at the same time giving you the opportunity to hone your skills even further. So, take advantage of what’s offered — and use it to maximize your employability!

Sources:

https://blog.linkedin.com/2019/september/17/announcing-skill-assessments-to-help-you-showcase-your-skills

https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/15288-linkedin-skill-assessments.html

https://medium.com/alternative-digital-marketing/linkedin-skill-assessments-are-they-worth-it-735867ebe6ae

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