Day 2: Conditional Statements: Switch | 10 Days of JavaScript – Hacker Rank Solution

Day 2: Conditional Statements: Switch | 10 Days of JavaScript – Hacker Rank Solution: Hey Guy’s In this post we are solving Day 2: Conditional Statements: Switch which is a part of 10 Days of JavaScript Series.

Day 2: Conditional Statements: Switch | 10 Days of JavaScript – Hacker Rank Solution

Objective

In this challenge, we learn about switch statements.

Task

Complete the getLetter(s) function in the editor. It has one parameter: a string, s, consisting of lowercase English alphabetic letters (i.e., a through z). It must return ABC, or D depending on the following criteria:

  • If the first character in string s is in the set {aeiou}, then return A.
  • If the first character in string s is in the set {bcdfg}, then return B.
  • If the first character in string s is in the set {hjklm}, then return C.
  • If the first character in string s is in the set {npqrstvwxyz}, then return D.

Hint: You can get the letter at some index i in s using the syntax s[i] or s.charAt(i).

Function Description

Complete the getLetter function in the editor below.
getLetter has the following parameters:

  • string s: a string

Returns

  • string: a single letter determined as described above

Input Format

Stub code in the editor reads a single string denoting s from stdin.

Constraints

  • 1 <= |s| <= 100, where |s| is the length of s.
  • String s contains lowercase English alphabetic letters (i.e., a through z) only.

Sample Input 0
adfgt

Sample Output 0
A

Explanation 0

The first character of string s = adfgt is a. Because the given criteria stipulate that we print A any time the first character is in {aeiou}, we return A as our answer.

Day 2: Conditional Statements: Switch | 10 Days of JavaScript – Hacker Rank Solution

'use strict';
process.stdin.resume();
process.stdin.setEncoding('utf-8');
let inputString = '';
let currentLine = 0;
process.stdin.on('data', inputStdin => {
    inputString += inputStdin;
});
process.stdin.on('end', _ => {
    inputString = inputString.trim().split('\n').map(string => {
        return string.trim();
    });
    main();
});
function readLine() {
    return inputString[currentLine++];
}
function getLetter(s) {
    let letter;
    // Write your code here
     switch (s[0]) {
        case ('a' || 'e' || 'o' || 'i' || 'u'):
            letter = 'A';
            break;
        case ('b' || 'c' || 'd' || 'f' || 'g'):
            letter = 'B';
            break;
        case ('h' || 'j' || 'k' || 'l' || 'm'):
            letter = 'C';
            break;
        case ('z' || 'n' || 'p' || 'q' || 'r' || 's' || 't' || 'v' || 'w' || 'x' || 'y'):
            letter = 'D';
    }
    return letter;
}
function main() {
    const s = readLine();
    console.log(getLetter(s));
}

Disclaimer: The above Problem (Day 2: Conditional Statements: Switch) is generated by Hackerrank but the Solution is Provided by Chase2Learn. This tutorial is only for Educational and Learning purposes. Authority if any of the queries regarding this post or website fill the following contact form thank you.

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